Pacific Northwest wild foods

I was looking up what food is in season locally so that I could start thinking about meal planning in the way that I like to. One of the resources I was using said wild mushrooms are at their best right now. I remember the lion’s mane in Washington would grow wild. It’s a tasty ingredient, and I wondered if it grew wild here too. So, I looked it up.

fungus-1194380_640.jpg
These are actually chanterelles, which are also found wild in WA. Source: pixabay

Turns out, it is not indigenous here but there is a local mushroom grower who sells fresh or sun dried mushrooms,  or even inoculated plugs or logs to grow your own. I am sorely tempted to give that a go.

So, watch this space. Perhaps I will grow mushrooms in our Pacific Northwest Inspired portion of the garden.

At our home in the UK, we now have a good and safe outdoor space to have a garden. We have divided the front yard into three areas – Hedgerow, Wildflower lawn, and Gravel garden – and our back yard into two main areas – Fragrance garden (for relaxing or entertaining) and Pacific Northwest Inspired.

wildflower-meadow-4442606_640.jpg
Source: pixabay

I am looking forward to the harvest of 2021. I have some special berry starts that I got from my aunt for my birthday. Daddy Alsum and I plan to train them to a wire fence (with a technique called espalier) so that we can make PNW jams, jelly, preserves, sauces, desserts etc etc etc. We have two thimbleberry starts, two salmonberry starts, two blue elderberry starts and two wild blackberry starts. Our elder starts were hit with cold frost this past week so I moved them today to the greenhouse and I hope they recover.

In the long term, I want two coast black gooseberries, two honeyberries, and two black raspberries as well. I am trying to control myself, but I seriously want all the gorgeous delicious berries.

berry-3513546_640
Source: pixabay

I need to exercise patience as well as restraint as it will take at least two years for the plants to establish to the extent needed for them to fruit. I am looking forward to the first year I have enough to make my own elderflower cordial. I love that stuff.

For now, I will be exploring earthy autumn foods while dreaming of the distant memory of sweet and tangy summer foods.

From mine to yours,

Mumma Alsum

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